Tag Archive: Fuel

On a Sunny Saturday Germany Gets 50% of Electricity from Solar Power

By producing 22 gigawatts of solar power per hour, German rooftops supplied 50% of the country’s electricity needs on a sunny Saturday in Mai.
ON-green-policy! Just for the record, Germany is no developing nation with a majority of the population off the grid, but one of the most developed country with a very energy intensive economy and living style. And, I might add that conditions for solar panels – even on a sunny day – are nowhere as favourable as in large parts of the US. Granted, the demand is lower on a Saturday but even on a working day, …

Tar Sands – European Sales Temporarily Saved by the Netherlands and UK

Tar sand oil has a bad reputation. Its production destroys large expanses of land and requiring huge amounts of energy (emanating from fossil fuel) input, heavily pollutes the atmosphere adding to global warming. Transporting the oil to refineries and consumers threatens even more land and people. In short, tar oil is about the dirtiest and most harmful source of energy you can think of. Now, Europe is on the brink to introduce a labeling system for energy sources according to their greenhouse gas footprint. Tar sand oil, will get the little attractive label of producing 22% more emissions than …

Biofuels – Equalling Libya’s Oil Output

Some interesting figures that are worth being noted. Biofuel production now consumes 40% of the US corn harvest. In terms of produced quantity, biofuels account for more fuel than the oil production of Libya. Biofuels become price competitive if oil costs more than 70 US$ / barrel – it has frequently topped 100 US$ in the last couple of years.
ON-green-policy. Biofuels are questionable in terms of carbon saving efficiency and also in terms of competing with food production. While the US, where 50% of the world’s biofuels are produced don’t go hungry, the recent boom in Biofuels still influences …

USA – Refuse Even to Fund Crumbling Highways

US highways are in a bad shape, one out of nine bridges are “structurally deficient”. Some 40 years after being built, upkeep is getting more expensive while available funding is decreasing. Due to falling mileage and better fuel efficiency of US cars, the 18.4 cents fuel tax per gallon is yielding less and less money. Between 2007 and 2010 the highway trust fund received one-seventh less money. At the same time, nobody seem to be prepared to pay more fuel tax and politicians don’t even dare thinking of it.
On the first sight it may be a surprise that car …